FOLKINCEPTION / THE HOLY BROKE

$7 adv , $10 door     Doors open at 7:30pm

http://folkinceptionholybroke.bpt.me

Folkinception's musical roots rise from the great American folk tradition and extend far into the realm of Americana and Rock n Roll. The band has been praised for their ability to “build a song from a whisper to a roar”. The music is firmly rooted in a song writing process that pays homage to life's triumphs, while confronting adversity with a defiant sense of optimism. Their sound, developed over the past six years, conveys a musical identity unique to their Northwest origins. Folkinception is putting their stamp an a new genre of music coming out of the Pacific Northwest today... Upper Left Americana.

Cello, violin, harmonica and vocal harmonies layer together to provide a uniquely original timbre; while electric guitar and Hammond organ vary between nuanced textures and soaring climactic heights. Drums, bass, acoustic guitar and piano round out the instrumentation and act as the driving, rhythmic force behind the songs. Since the band’s inception in 2011 Folkinception has evolved into a regional fan favorite; supporting many of the great up and coming, independent bands touring the Northwest today. Folkinception has shared the stage with Fruition, Hot Buttered Rum, The Lil' Smokies, Dead Winter Carpenters, Polecat, Hillstomp, Cornmeal and many more. The band is currently working with Producer Chris White of Comrade Studios (LA/Seattle/Spokane) on their second, full length album, to be released mid-2017.
http://www.folkinception.com/
The Holy Broke (Spokane, WA), ambiguous name for the growling solo work of Kent Ueland, encapsulates his dark, messy music and all its jagged shards. You won’t find stained glass tributes to lost loves or idle words about a better life in his lyrics. No, Ueland is the busted and bitter. Equal parts the man sunken into his couch and the snarling boy smiling through his bleeding upper lip, the classic country riffs carry Ueland’s vocals through a debauched journey into heartache. The relatable simplicity of struggling to pay rent, eat a decent meal, or even get out of bed give his songwriting a surprising power. There lies the ambiguity. Has something holy been broken? Is it a form of holiness to be broke? Is there no such thing as the concept, “holy,” to begin with? Look for the forthcoming album Do It Yourself this winter, listen to it when you’re down on your luck, listen to it to celebrate not being there, but most of all listen. An injured dog is howling
www.theholybroke.com